600 Dogs, a “Suicide” Bridge, and Black Shucks

Note: When articles cross two or more topics I routinely research, I’m planning to post those articles here. It’s simpler than trying to choose one of my other websites… and risk selecting one that isn’t the best match.

Black shucks – made famous in Conan Doyle’s story, The Hound of the Baskervilles – have always fascinated me. As a child, I was terrified of large dogs, and that may have contributed to my interest in them.  (Eventually, I outgrew my fear of large dogs… but I’d still prefer to avoid black shucks.)

Dangerous bridge and black shucks - a connection?In 2008, when Armchair Reader: Weird, Scary & Unusual asked me to write a chapter about black shucks, I was delighted to share what I’d learned about those mysterious creatures.

So, what are black shucks?

In 1901, author William Dutt described the black shuck. “He takes the form of a huge black dog, and prowls along dark lanes and lonesome field footpaths, where, although his howling makes the hearer’s blood run cold, his footfalls make no sounds.”

  • Shucks have been reported for centuries. They’re not just legends. As recently as the late 20th century, police officers have encountered them.
  • Most shucks are reported along England’s east coast, including the town of Cromer.
  • The Cabell family (the basis of the Baskervilles, in the Sherlock Holmes story) has other ghost stories, but the black shuck may be the most famous.
  • In Norfolk’s town of Overstrand, there is even a Shuck Lane where shucks have been seen.
  • Shucks and eerie black dogs have been reported in Wales and Scotland, too.

Some of the most reliable recent stories place black shucks at or near bridges. (Coltishall Bridge, just north of Norfolk, is one of them.)

Often, those bridges have suicide stories, as well. So, though I’m sad (beyond words) to read the following news story, it may be important for paranormal researchers. Will black shucks appear there in the future? I’m not sure if I’d want to see – or even hear – one.

Of course, I’m not sure a black shuck is a “ghost.” It may be something people categorize in the fae realm, perhaps the Unseelie Court. Or perhaps it’s best categorized in cryptozoology.

Also – as you’ll read in the following article – there are the other, actual ghost stories at this active location.

Be forewarned: this story is horrifying. I don’t want to sound callous, or as if I’m trivializing how awful this is. As an animal lover, I hope they find an answer to this terrible situation, soon, if they haven’t already resolved it.

But, as a paranormal researcher, it was also of note for future investigations. Maybe nothing weird is going on. Maybe it can be explained by minks in the area, or something else.

If you’re investigating around Overtoun, keep this in mind.

Here’s part of the article, “600 dogs have attempted suicide from the mysterious ‘haunted suicide bridge’ in Scotland.” (The full article is linked at the foot of this page.)

ghosts - divider

Around 600 hundred dogs have attempted suicide from the Overtoun bridge in Scotland. And all the dogs jumped from the exact same point!

Experts are baffled and are unable to explain the mystery.

600 dogs have leaped from the bridge (Image source: Twitter/)

The bridge has a history of 160 years and has been responsible for the deaths of a specific kind of dogs: those with long snouts, such as German Shepherds, Labrador Retrievers and Scottish Terriers.

A number of locals believe that the bridge as well as the Overtoun house is haunted by the spirit of ‘The White Lady of Overtoun’.

The bridge is nicknamed as ‘Dog suicide bridge’. 

…  The bridge even carries a signpost warning people to keep their dogs on a lead.

Overtoun Bridge
The signpost warning against dog suicides at Overtoun Bridge. (Image source: Twitter/Ruben)

Dogs have continued to leap from the bridge, and this strange phenomenon has gone unexplained since as early as the 1950s. Experts believe that dogs might be attracted by the animals hiding under the bridge, causing them to leap.

Dr. David Sand of Animal Behavioral Clinic explains that it is impossible for dogs to attempt suicide… He elaborates that there could be other factors motivating dogs to carry out such a misadventure, one being mink urine.

Overtoun Bridge
Locals believe that the bridge is haunted. (Image source: Facebook)

Paul Owens, the author of ‘Baron of the Rainbow Bridge: Overtoun’s death leaping dog mystery’, argues that there is a supernatural presence on the bridge, forcing the dogs to leap.

The mystery behind the bridge has attracted worldwide attention and supernatural theories have been proposed so far, some even calling it the ‘Thin Place’ where afterlife and physical world meet.

Different theories have been put forward to explain the dogs’ bizarre behavior. However, there have been no solutions; the mystery bridge continues to claim lives of the dogs.

The post 600 dogs have attempted suicide from the mysterious ‘haunted suicide bridge’ in Scotland appeared first on Journal Post.

Thank you, Coast to Coast AM!

Tonight’s radio show was so much fun, I want to thank everyone involved.

George Noory was a gracious host, and his extensive background in paranormal topics made the two hours practically fly. (I’m glad I had a chance to vote for him at the National Radio Hall of Fame, shortly before polling closed tonight.)

Thanks also to the many listeners who called into the show with fascinating questions and insights. (Also, I’m grateful to those who were in the audience, nodding in agreement and contributing such positive energy to the evening. Everything about the show really felt right.)

Of course, the show ran smoothly from start to finish, due to the high level of professionalism of the Coast to Coast AM staff, including Lisa, Stephanie, and Tom. I appreciate how easy they made… well, everything connected with the show.

If there’s such a thing as a perfect radio show for people in my research field, I think Coast to Coast AM is it.

I’m still smiling, and glad I had a chance to be on such a respected radio show. It was a wonderful experience.

Thanks so very much!

(Coast to Coast AM subscribers can hear the replay almost immediately. In addition, Coast to Coast AM shows are available at YouTube, about three weeks after they initially aired.)

Why Paranormal Research?

With tonight’s radio show looming, I’ve been trying to record videos to answer the most likely questions.  (They’re at my YouTube channel.)

Here’s the latest, explaining why I’m still a paranormal researcher, and a little about what I do that’s unique.

The “TL;DR” summary..?

One of my main goals is to be sure that everyone who wants a paranormal experience, can have one.

In this video, I describe some of the nuts-and-bolts of my work.

That goal is why I keep fine-tuning my system of analyzing repeating patterns of odd, ghostly, and other paranormal events.

With that information, I can often predict when & where people will encounter something eerie. And, in some cases, I can share insights about how to increase the chances of it happening, with specific triggers. That’s not just about objects, but also about the kind of person (or his/her demeanor) that seems to make a difference.

Radio Show Interview

On Monday night, June 18/19, I’ll be a guest on George Noory’s “Coast to Coast AM” radio show. My segment airs from midnight to 2 AM, west coast (USA) time. (Here, on the east coast, I’ll be listening to the show – and speaking, by phone, with Mr. Noory – between 3 AM and 5 AM.)

Coast to Coast AM radio show

I’m expecting to focus on the Mandela Effect, but – depending upon how the discussion goes – also include insights about other paranormal phenomena. Of course, most of my discoveries have been related to ghosts and haunted places, but we may also discuss how faeries fit into the broad scope of my research.

If that middle-of-the-night time doesn’t fit your schedule, Coast to Coast AM subscribers can hear the replay almost immediately.

In addition, Coast to Coast AM shows are available at YouTube, about three weeks after they initially aired.

The Reality of Psi – A Shift in Past Attitudes

Reality of Psi - A Shift in Past AttitudesThis week, Mark – a friend and visitor to my ghost hunting site, HollowHill.com – posted a comment about a recent report in the American Psychological Association’ academic journal.

The Daily Grail summarized the report and some of its implications, in The Reality of Psi: Leading Journal Publishes a Paper Revealing for Superpowers of the Mind.

Here’s the opening of that article.

Is controversial research into telepathy and other seeming ‘super-powers’ of the mind starting to be more accepted by orthodox science? In its latest issue, American Psychologist – the official peer-reviewed academic journal of the American Psychological Association – has published a paper that reviews the research so far into parapsychological (‘psi’) abilities, and concludes that the “evidence provides cumulative support for the reality of psi, which cannot be readily explained away by the quality of the studies, fraud, selective reporting, experimental or analytical incompetence, or other frequent criticisms.”

The new paper – “The experimental evidence for parapsychological phenomena: a review“, by Etzel Cardeña of Lund University – also discusses recent theories from physics and psychology “that present psi phenomena as at least plausible”, and concludes with recommendations for further progress in the field.

The abstract of that paper summarized a dilemma many paranormal researchers deal with, daily.

“Throughout history, people have reported events that seem to violate the common sense view of space and time.”

Of course, that’s been a long-time issue: Arguing against closed minds that reject our “what if?” musings as contrary to common sense.

Worse, those critics seem to portray our questions as assertions, when we’re simply trying to open the door to scientific investigations.

But now, papers like Cardeña’s provide support. We can point to that research and repeat what we’ve been saying since at least the 19th century: Let’s explore these topics to find the real answers.

I’m delighted to see us move beyond absolute rejection under the guise of “common sense.”

Right now, my favorite quote is, “The important thing is not to stop questioning.” That’s something Albert Einstein said.

Or, as the Bible reminds us, “knock, and it shall be opened unto you.” (Matthew 7:7)

I feel as if we’ve waited a long time for this door to be opened, even a sliver.

Yes, it’s just one paper, but it’s a significant step forward.

Sources

Daily Grail article: http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Famp0000236

The abstract: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29792448

The full paper: http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Famp0000236

Photo credit: Marko Blazevic for Unsplash.

Review – What Are Ghosts Made Of?

A recent article at Higgypop attempts to answer the question, “What are ghosts made of?

While no one can answer that with complete confidence, the Higgypop article covered some interesting theories. I agree with most, but not all of them.

Here are some excerpts from that article, with my thoughts:

…if people are able to sense the presence of a ghost, detect them with ghost hunting gadgets, or even see an apparition, then there must be something measurable and tangible that creates them.

What are ghosts made of?My reaction…? Yes, and no.

If we assume that spirit (God, the Universe, Deity) creates matter, I’m not sure we need to (or even can) assume that God has a physical body that we can measure.

And, if people are created in the likeness of their creator, I’m not sure each has to retain some physical form after death, in order to create energy in this reality/world/realm.

The article then explains the difference between “intelligent hauntings” and “residual hauntings.” (Many of us use different phrases for them. I’ve discussed this at length at HollowHill.com.)

About residual hauntings, the Higgypop article says:

The phenomenon is known as “stone tape theory” due to the belief that energy is captured and stored like a video recording in the surrounding bricks, woodwork, stone and possibly even the soil. When the conditions are right, these materials release this energy and you sense or see the event occur in exactly the same position as it did years ago.

That’s a pretty good summary.

Also, I like this about ghosts and spirits:

When it comes to intelligent hauntings it’s a little different. These types of hauntings are the classic “ghost”, they can reportedly move objects, push or touch people, slam doors and even throw objects across a room. So clearly when they manifest there is some kind of physical force behind them.

But then the article says something that – to me – seems like it goes a little too far out on a limb.

Many paranormal researchers believe that when someone dies, they continue to live on outside of their body as a form of electromagnetic energy, similar to the electrical impulses in the human brain. It’s thought that it is this EM energy that is responsible for ghosts. This is why ghost hunters often use electromagnetic field meters to detect the presence of ghosts.

Perhaps some paranormal researchers think all ghosts are a form of electromagnetic energy. Do most researchers think that…? No.  (I’m guessing that “many” falls between those two extremes.)

But personally,  I’m not willing to conclude that. Not at this point in our research.

I think they may (or may not) be in an environment where EMF exists and functions different to how it does in our reality.

So, I freely admit: I haven’t a clue why we measure EMF surges that correlate with activity we call ghostly. (I have some theories, but they’re merely guesses spanning a wide range of paranormal phenomena. At this point, it’s important to keep an open mind.)

Despite my disagreements with the article – most of them minor (and some, admittedly, just me being too picky) – I’m nodding in agreement with the conclusion:

While some ghost sightings can be written off as hoaxes, the majority of ghost sightings come from people who genuinely believe they have seen something supernatural. So whether ghosts are electromagnetic energy, a reflection of the past, or a trick of the mind, you can’t take the experience away from someone who has witnessed a ghost.

read the full, original article I quoted:

https://www.higgypop.com/news/what-are-ghosts-made-of/

I’m interested in your opinions and insights, if you’d like to leave a comment at this article.

Misinterpreting the Mandela Effect

Right now, I’m working on a book series about the Mandela Effect. The first book – which has been my main focus for the past few weeks – is going to be a quick overview for those with a casual interest in the topic.

Misunderstanding the Mandela Effect. Fiona muses about news reports. For me, it’s another reminder that people don’t always “hear” text the way it was intended. But, as I’m researching others’ explanations for this quirky phenomenon, I’m also seeing some bizarre interpretations of things I’ve said online.

Oh, it’s not news that snarks, hyperbole, and sarcasm rarely convey clearly in text.

In the case of the Mandela Effect, I’ll have to include musings and “what if…?” speculation to that list.

For me, the Mandela Effect is like other paranormal topics I’m studying. I have absolutely no doubt that something odd is going on.

Also, I’m fairly sure that the Mandela Effect – like ghosts, faeries, and related subjects – can’t be explained (or shrugged off) with just one, all-purpose explanation.

In the case of the Mandela Effect, too many disparate reports match up in eerie ways.

  • They can’t be dismissed as just one or two people (or even a troll collective) submitting prank reports.
  • The “false memory” label doesn’t fit the reports, universally.
  • Nor can I attribute something as widespread as the Berenstein Bears’ issue as a literacy problem, or any of the myriad other explanations skeptics like to insist upon.

However, as much as I like the parallel realities concept – and feel that, in a way, it’s kind of an Occam’s Razor answer – I’m not going to insist on it.

In a February 2018 article in the British newspaper, The Independent, I read this:

Broome explains the Mandela effect via pseudoscientific theories. She claims that differences arise from movement between parallel realities (the multiverse). This is based on the theory that within each universe alternative versions of events and objects exist.

That’s too funny. Of course I don’t claim that. I offer the multiverse theory as one speculative, fun explanation. But – even if it’s among my favorite, “what if…?” theories – it’s only one of many.

And, if I were discussing the Mandela Effect seriously, the multiverse would be far down the list of most likely explanations.

(For starters, I usually tell people to research everything they can, related to the alternate memory they seem to recall. Maybe there’s a logical answer to the mystery. Perhaps it started as a simple misunderstanding, some troll-ish mischief, or an April Fool’s joke that someone thought was serious.)

Oh, back in the early days (2009- 2010), Mandela Effect conversations were different. We were a small group – maybe a dozen or so people – sharing thoughts via comments at my website.

I’m pretty sure all of us knew the difference between when someone was serious, and when they were having fun with “what if…?” speculation.

By April 2011, far more people had joined the conversation. Some took the topic more seriously than others. In general, the tone was still “what the heck is this, anyway?” as we tried to sort the evidence and possible explanations.

In other words, few people – including me – locked into just one reason for the Mandela Effect.  Our conversations were sincere, but also light in tone. Most of us recognized how strange it all sounded, even to us.

Then, in 2015 after the Berenstein/Berenstain Bears topic went viral, I guess my whimsical tone of voice didn’t convey well in what people read. Or they didn’t go back to see the wide range of theories and banter we’d already shared.

So, some mistakenly think I take everything very seriously, and insist on just one Mandela Effect theory.

For example, in a 2015 article at Psychology Today, I see this:

Broome believes memories that are out of sync with recorded history occur because our minds get entangled with alternate universes. According to the “Many Worlds” hypothesis proposed by quantum physicists Hugh Everett and Bryce DeWitt, the world splits into parallel universes every time a quantum event happens. Thus, while Nelson Mandela did not die in prison in the 1980s, at least in this universe, there is some other universe in which this did occur. And Broome’s memory of the event is proof that her mind has come into contact with that alternate universe!

Umm… no. My own late 1980s’ memory could be badly flawed. It could be a mish-mash of several funerals in TV news reports. I’ve never claimed otherwise.

In fact, that’s why I’d never mentioned that memory until someone else (Dragon Con’s security manager, Shadow) brought up the topic. I was absolutely amazed that anyone else shared that weird, unsupported memory… much less thousands of people.

In fact, it’s probably an understatement to say I was amazed. Utterly stunned and flabbergasted might be better terms.

But even (or perhaps especially) knowing that others share the memory of Nelson Mandela’s funeral in the late 1980s, “normal” explanations elude me.

A few things really baffle me. They include others’ reports with details (that I’d omitted from public posts, deliberately) that matched my memories of the Mandela funeral, 100%.

Also, I’ve never found other funerals from that era with details that I could have conflated.

Yes, most critics insist I’m remembering Steve Biko‘s funeral, but that was in 1977, when I lived in northern California. The funeral I recall was on the TV when we lived in Florida, so that places it between 1987 and early 1990. Also, the TV coverage continued for days, at least two and possibly three.

But, being somewhat skeptical by nature, I’m still not certain that my memory of the Mandela funeral is accurate. I’m open to other explanations.

As a Mandela Effect researcher, I try to keep an open mind. Also, in addition to trying to explain my memory of that funeral, I’m looking for an explanation for the thousands of other people who seem to share that quirky memory.

Like me, they seem to recall several days of TV coverage, the outdoor speeches under a big tree, the emotional widow and her bodyguard, the odd assortment of folding chairs, and so on. Lots of details that usually (but not always) match my memories. That still seems very odd, and I’m still hoping for a simple, non-weird explanation.

But, that’s very different from claiming that my “mind has come in contact with [an] alternate universe.”

Of course, the person who wrote that article might have written it as humor. Again, text doesn’t always convey tone of voice.

It’d be kind of cool if I did feel confident that I’d crossed time, space, or dimensions, and ventured into an alternate world. That sounds like tremendous fun.

Alas, I don’t have that kind of confidence, though I love the parallel realities explanation. Among all the options, it’s easily my favorite, and it seems to resonate with many of my friends and fans.

Even better, quantum studies seem to suggest that parallel realities are, well, real. So, that could be the best, single explanation for my “alternate” memories, and others’.

But… yes, I’m still looking for patterns that will explain paranormal phenomena, including the Mandela Effect. I’d love simple, single answers.

Meanwhile, I’m in a world where writing books still involves research, putting words on a page, editing those words, and then publishing them.

But hey, if anyone knows the gateway to a universe where thoughts go directly to printed words and then magically appear in books, let me know. 

(And, just in case a reporter mistakes that for a serious request: Yes, I am laughing as I make that request, but I also know we may not be far from achieving some of that. That’s the fun of “what if…?” speculation: Sometimes, it actually becomes real.)

April Update – 2018’s Paranormal Trends

Recently, TV producers have been asking me for insights about paranormal trends. Some already have a good idea for a TV series. Others want me to suggest ideas, locations, or possible cast members.

Here’s what I’ve seen as of April 2018. If you have additional ideas, or disagree heartily, I hope you’ll post a comment at this article. (Include your site link if you’re willing to talk with interested TV producers.)

Also, I’ve created a free, eight-page report (PDF) explaining these trends in more detail. Click here to download Paranormal Trends – April 2018.

2018’S TRENDS, so far

Paranormal trends - your thoughts?

  1. People are less interested in the adrenaline spike (“Dude, run!”), all by itself. It’s fun but, they also want more information, like exactly what is going on, and perhaps why it’s happening. They still want thrills, but they want to feel assured that what they’re seeing is real.
  2. They’re revisiting the concept of haunted/energized objects. That covers “cursed” objects as well as weird things that keep landing back at the local second-hand shop. This is a more in-depth interest than in the past.
  3. The topic of demonic activity keeps cycling around, and it’s emerging again now. But, like point #1, above: viewers want deeper insights. (I’m not convinced this is suitable as “entertainment.” I’m just talking about trends I see in the ~500 emails I receive, daily, from friends, fans, and followers.)
  4. “Okay, it’s haunted. What now…?” That’s a comment I’ve been hearing as people joke about past TV shows. I’m not sure if they want a “where are they now?” segment about past show locations (and their owners), or if they want something that goes into really dealing with haunted houses.
  5. “What else is haunted/weird near [location]?” Or, “is there another place that has the same kind of weirdness as [location]?” Instead of a series of episodes that hop all over the landscape, people want a cohesive connection between the episodes. Think of it in terms of a scripted series, and each episode ends on a connected cliffhanger, not just a “Next week, on this show…” preview.

The Trend I Didn’t See

Over a week ago, I asked several respected friends to share their thoughts and comments on these trends (and others that they see).  I even put a request at HollowHill.com, my most popular ghost-related website.

I several great suggestions, which are going into a free report I’m writing, today. But, fewer than five people were willing to talk with TV producers, even if it might mean starring in a TV series.

Wow. That’s a trend I never saw coming.  If I’d posted this same article just three or four years ago, I’d have been deluged with “I want to be a TV star” messages.

At this point, I have to shift my attention back to my current projects: the free ghost hunting courses, my books, an upcoming appearance on George Noory’s radio show, and so on.

But, don’t worry. You didn’t miss your opportunity altogehter.

If you have a strong background/interest in paranormal research, and you’d love to share your ideas with TV producers, you can still do that.

Leave a brief comment (with a link to your website) at this article. I’ll point TV producers to it, so they can contact you directly.

Comment with your views about paranormal trends in general, in real life and on TV, and what you’d like to see on TV (or even be involved with).

Every few days, I’ll approve all non-spam comments, and – time permitting – reply in comments of my own.

2018 – So Far, So Good

The past two years (or so) were tumultuous. I talked about that in my January 2018 post about what’s changing in paranormal research.

I spent a large part of 2017 re-evaluating my career direction, adjusting my business model, and taking preliminary steps – course corrections, in a way – to focus on my strengths.

In 2018, I’ve already made good progress. Here’s some of what’s been going on, behind the scenes.

Hallowfields, which will include all of my free ghost hunting courses, is still expanding. The first course – Introduction to Ghost Hunting – is at the site, and I’m adding to it, a little at a time.

Yesterday, we replaced all of my older YouTube videos to make each playlist distinct. It was a far bigger project than I imagined.

That paves the road so I can record & upload many more short videos for all of my websites, but especially for Hallowfields.

One of the most surprising aspects of that video project…?  Discovering how many decisions – and how many hours of work – go into an eight-second intro clip.  Wow. I have renewed respect for people editing TV shows and movies.

Meanwhile, editing and updating my books is also a more time-intensive project than I’d expected. Looking back, I regret asking my publishers to remove the old editions before the new ones were ready. (Oops.) I’m making progress, but have no ETAs yet.

Hollow Hill will be expanding, as soon as I have a little more time. For example, I still want to restore all of my podcasts, or at least the ones that are still valid. And, of course, add more articles.

People have asked why I don’t do more with the Mandela Effect site.

That’s complex.

First, MandelaEffect.com was intended as a “what if…?” site. It was a fun, quirky topic. For the first couple of years, it was a hobby site. I loved the weird, speculative conversations with people like Vivek, Julia, Mike, Martin, Gurluas, and so on.

Then, the topic’s popularity spiked and – with it – the time necessary to moderate/update MandelaEffect.com, as well as its hosting bills. Ugh. That’s not what I thought I’d signed up for.

Now & then, I consider redirecting traffic to the Wayback Machine. Then I realize the importance of the Mandela Effect site. It should remain online, and I should expand & improve it in my spare time.

Yes, I suppose I could go on TV & radio shows, or resume my guest appearances at Dragon Con, etc.  Yes, those could provide very nice income to support & expand the Mandela Effect website.

I turn down those opportunities, not just because I like my privacy. (But, that’s a large part of it.)

It’s also because the things some people say…  well, I don’t deal with those who insist that my motives are sinister.  Not when they’re extreme and high volume, and my rational arguments seem only to make things worse.

So, I opt for privacy and a happy life. I choose to do as much good as I can, online and in my community. Despite my unusual career, my life is pretty much mundane. I’m a devoted wife, a caring mom, and – in my own way – a hippie/idealist who just wants a better, happier world.

Every day, I like being the person who supports paranormal research with fresh ideas, important insights, and – for income – how-to books and some quiet, behind-the-scenes consulting for TV shows.

I know that old friends and new researchers are eager to learn about my newest discoveries. And I have so much to share, it’s probably time to post this and get back to work.

A Weird Kind of Fame – Mandela Effect

As someone who’s always preferred a quiet life, I’m always astonished (or perhaps aghast) when something I do attracts attention.

This week, it’s the X-Files.

HollywoodLife.com illustration

Really, they created an X-Files (reboot) episode around the Mandela Effect.

* blink, blink *

I think it’s Season 11, Episode 4, “The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat.”

I’m about to watch it on Hulu, and try not to act like a hyper-protective parent, as if the Mandela Effect is entirely mine.

Of course, my website kind of started it all. And yes, I popularized the phrase… but with the help of a few hundred thousand (or more) people who’ve had something to say about the topic, regularly. And at least several million more who’ve shown interest.

But still, seeing the Mandela Effect featured in an X-Files episode, for heaven’s sake… that’s just surreal. It’s like a part of my life, and it’s on the TV screen. I can’t seem to grasp that this is happening. Even if the show is tongue-in-cheek parody/humor.

At the moment, I’m stunned. And kind of chuckling over how weird this is. And then I’m back to blink-blink mode, kind of overwhelmed.

And, because this is how my mind works…

Since that TV show will bring a lot more attention to the Mandela Effect, I threw together some free iron-on designs that fans can use for DIY t-shirt printing. They’re linked in my MandelaEffect.com article, That X-Files Episode.